NAB Wellbeing Report: Q4 2015

In this report, we take a look at longer term wellbeing trends, focussing on those groups that have historically reported the lowest wellbeing.

By

How Australians assess the quality of their lives

Australia’s wellbeing has fallen driven by heightened levels of anxiety – around 40% of Australians are feeling “highly” anxious, the highest reading since the survey began. Of concern, anxiety continues to be a much bigger issue for younger Australians, particularly young women.

The NAB Wellbeing Index fell to 64.4 in Q4 2015 (65 in Q3), with all measures rated lower, except life satisfaction.

Among key demographic groups, wellbeing was typically highest for those in SA/NT & VIC, capital cities, on high incomes (+$100K), aged over 50 and male, widowed, single households, without children, technical workers and not employed. Wellbeing was lowest for young Australian women, singles and low income earners (<$35K).

Wellbeing is most positively influenced by our family and personal relationships, our homes and personal safety. Events such as abuse and a lack of time detract most. In terms of where we live, a safe community, good local shops & parks and gardens, contribute most to our personal wellbeing.

In this report, we take a look at longer term wellbeing trends, focussing on those groups that have historically reported the lowest wellbeing – i.e. single people, young women (18-29), middle aged men (30-49) and low income earners (earning less than $35,000 per annum).

On average, these Australians typically rate their personal wellbeing lowest for each wellbeing measure. But, the main inhibitors to higher wellbeing are notably different in each group. For example, young women are by far the most anxious group, but anxiety levels among the lowest income earners is just below the Australian average and much lower than in many
other demographic groups.

For more details, please refer to the attached document.