AUTHORS

Gerard Burg

Gerard Burg

Senior Economist

“He is responsible for monitoring and forecasting trends in emerging Asian economies”

Gerard has over a decade of experience as a professional economist, currently specialising in international economic research. He is responsible for monitoring and forecasting trends in emerging Asian economies, with a particular emphasis on China. He is also a member of the bank’s commodities research team, focusing on trends in iron ore and coal markets.

Gerard joined NAB in 2005, and previously focused on risk analysis across a range of industry sectors in Australia and abroad. He had particular expertise in areas such as Mining, Manufacturing, Healthcare and Retail, including the development of research into online retail sales. Prior to joining NAB, he was an economist with the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics, focusing on commodities and energy research.

He holds Bachelors degrees in Economics (with Honours) and Commerce from the Australian National University.

RECENTLY PUBLISHED ARTICLES

Old King Coal – coal still a big part of China’s energy mix but its role is on the wane

Steady as she goes – economic growth and other key indicators stable in Q2.

In May, international ratings agency Moody’s announced a downgrade for China’s sovereign credit rating, citing the country’s rising debt as a key factor in this decision.

Trends stable across the board, no sign of a major economic slowdown.

Belt and Road Initiative – can the reality of the program meet China’s grand ambitions?

Key indicators a little softer in April, pointing to easing economic growth in Q2.

Short term spike in coking coal masks softer trend for bulks.

China’s income inequality improving but still some long term challenges.

An improving US-China relationship provides a better environment for China’s economy.

Geo-political risks fail to dent global reflation…for now.

Rise of the machines: could automation help sustain China’s long term growth momentum.

An encouraging start to 2017 – although strength still comes from the old economy, with retail trends disappointing.

From a political perspective, President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the TPP reflected US sentiment against globalisation, particularly in the mid-west rust belt.

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