AUTHORS

Rodrigo Catril

Rodrigo Catril

“Rodrigo contributes to the creation of trade ideas and research publications, and advises our internal and external clients on developments in global foreign exchange markets.”

Rodrigo is a Currency Strategist and member of the FX strategy team at NAB. In this role, he contributes to the creation of trade ideas and research publications, and advises our internal and external clients on developments in global foreign exchange markets.

Rodrigo has lived and worked around the world. Before coming to Australia, he worked in London for Henderson Global Investors, firstly as the Head of Risk Measurement and then as a Quantitative Analyst in the Global Fixed Income Hedge Team. In 2009, Rodrigo made his move to NAB as an investment strategist within the private wealth division. He then worked in Rate Strategy for four years, before taking on his role today as Currency Strategist.

Rodrigo was born in Chile, and holds a Bachelor of Commerce, Honours and Masters in Economics from the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. He’s also a CFA charter holder, and has a diploma of Financial Markets (AFMA).

RECENTLY PUBLISHED ARTICLES

Which way will the markets be pulled this week?

The US President declares the economy is roaring back following 4.8 million new jobs in June.

Dr Fauci has declared the virus as ‘out of control’ in the US and more measures need to be brought in to contain it.

The easing of banks’ investment rules contained in the so-called ‘Volcker Rule’ has helped to boost stocks.

In a day that’s been light on news, markets have had a chance to take a more positive outlook, pushing equities higher and the US dollar lower.

The markets lost a chunk of optimism last week.

After a solid April, the AUD/USD began May with some trepidation dipping below the 64 cents mark a few times early in the month

The US Fed has reiterated that they will do whatever it takes to protect the US economy, with inflation expected to remain below 2 percent through to 2022.

Australia has entered a recession but, as Josh Frydenberg was quick to point out yesterday, the Q1 fall in GDP was miniscule compared to most of the rest of the world.

It’s all good news as far as the markets are concerned, pushing the Aussie dollar even higher.

The Australian dollar has lost ground as China threatened to ban imports of Australian coal.

Equities have staged a broad-based rebound and are expected to continue as markets reopen in the US and UK.

The US President has said the US needs to get back to work, vaccine or not.

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