AUTHORS

Rodrigo Catril

Rodrigo Catril

“Rodrigo contributes to the creation of trade ideas and research publications, and advises our internal and external clients on developments in global foreign exchange markets.”

Rodrigo is a Currency Strategist and member of the FX strategy team at NAB. In this role, he contributes to the creation of trade ideas and research publications, and advises our internal and external clients on developments in global foreign exchange markets.

Rodrigo has lived and worked around the world. Before coming to Australia, he worked in London for Henderson Global Investors, firstly as the Head of Risk Measurement and then as a Quantitative Analyst in the Global Fixed Income Hedge Team. In 2009, Rodrigo made his move to NAB as an investment strategist within the private wealth division. He then worked in Rate Strategy for four years, before taking on his role today as Currency Strategist.

Rodrigo was born in Chile, and holds a Bachelor of Commerce, Honours and Masters in Economics from the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. He’s also a CFA charter holder, and has a diploma of Financial Markets (AFMA).

RECENTLY PUBLISHED ARTICLES

The US dollar continued to rise at the end of last week hitting a two-month high after the surprisingly bullish outlook from the Fed, but is the Aussie dollar paying too high a price?

US CPI was a higher than expected but the Market seems to have taken it largely in its stride.

Bond yields are pushing lower and market volatility is easing.

Not too good, not too bad, that seems to have been the market response to the non-farm payrolls numbers out of the US on Friday.

There was speculation that the Fed would taper sooner rather than later.

The RBA didn’t steer from its earlier stance that it was too soon to be looking at any changes in policy right now.

The RBNZ surprised many yesterday by indicating there could be an interest rate rise as soon as next year.

Equities are back on the rise and bond yields are falling, slightly, as investors seem to have accepted the line of most central banks that inflation is only transitory.

Share markets are riding high again in the US despite a triple whammy of disappointing reports.

The risk off mood is being driven by increasing inflation concerns.

Inflation expectations continues to influence markets.

The Bank of England has upped its forecasts for the growth of the UK economy this year – from 5 percent a few months ago, up to 7.25 percent.

The Fed’s board continues to talk down the prospect of tapering, pushing the argument that price rises will be transitory.

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