AUTHORS

David de Garis

David de Garis

Director and Senior Economist

“Dave writes for the Bank’s daily and weekly economics and market reports, and speaks with the media, often on a day to day basis speaking about the economy and financial markets”

Dave is a Director and Senior Economist with the NAB.

His bread and butter work is as a business, treasury or financial markets economist, speaking with clients ranging from the Bank’s agribusiness and corporate clients as well as to institutional clients at home and abroad.

He’s writes for the Bank’s daily and weekly economics and market reports, and speaks with the media, often on a day to day basis speaking about the economy and financial markets.

Dave did his economics apprenticeship with federal governments of various persuasions in Canberra, before he left Canberra in the late 1980s. He finished his indenture in Canberra as a senior economic adviser in the then Prime Minister Bob Hawke’s Department in Canberra, and before that in the Federal Treasury and the Bureau of Statistics.

RECENTLY PUBLISHED ARTICLES

Medley: labour market, state GSP, housing, and Amazon.

The UK Budget was handed down overnight and UK growth estimates have been marked down from low productivity.

The RBNZ this morning has left rates on hold at 1.75% but the language has spurred some Kiwi buying.

It’s been a very quiet night for markets, the DXY and BBDXY making some net gains, but more from commodity currency weakness.

RBA to stick with gradual inflation uplift ahead

In the last hour, President Trump has announced that Jerome Powell will be the next Chair of the Fed, as has been widely flagged in recent days. So no surprises there.

The news on the state of the US and European economies has been good overnight, adding more sunshine to the global growth acceleration story.

US markets right have been caught between 1) the on-going negotiations over tax between the White House and Republicans, 2) who will be the next Fed Chair (the market seems to be positioning for a Taylor-Powell duo but there’s still no news), and 3) the course of the broader economy.

Consumption has held despite consumer worries.

It’s been an overnight session marked by generally limited moves in currencies – the Pound the exception – bond yields have been steady-to lower on net, equities down smalls with commodities mixed.

It’s been a mix of events in the UK (better data), Europe (no immediate declared Catalan independence from Puigdemont) and the US (Trump tax politics and a softer NFIB report) that have provided the background for limited currency moves overnight.

Potpourri: inflation ponderings, people and cranes.

There have certainly been some unsettling events over the past 24-48 hours for markets to ponder.

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