AUTHORS

David de Garis

David de Garis

Director and Senior Economist

“Dave writes for the Bank’s daily and weekly economics and market reports, and speaks with the media, often on a day to day basis speaking about the economy and financial markets”

Dave is a Director and Senior Economist with the NAB.

His bread and butter work is as a business, treasury or financial markets economist, speaking with clients ranging from the Bank’s agribusiness and corporate clients as well as to institutional clients at home and abroad.

He’s writes for the Bank’s daily and weekly economics and market reports, and speaks with the media, often on a day to day basis speaking about the economy and financial markets.

Dave did his economics apprenticeship with federal governments of various persuasions in Canberra, before he left Canberra in the late 1980s. He finished his indenture in Canberra as a senior economic adviser in the then Prime Minister Bob Hawke’s Department in Canberra, and before that in the Federal Treasury and the Bureau of Statistics.

RECENTLY PUBLISHED ARTICLES

The Turkish Lira continues to fall.

The US move to push ahead with sanctions against Iran will heighten tensions with Europe.

Markets revert to trade focus as China announces specific tariff rises on $60bn goods should the US $200bn threat come into force.

The market reaction to today’s US announcement on Chinese import tariffs, the FOMC meeting this morning and a near certain rate rise from the Bank of England.

The markets somehow expected more from the Bank of Japan but there was swifter market reaction to news that the US and China might restart trade talks.

The Weekly looks in detail at some of the trends in SEEK job ads and what they tell us about the trends in the various state economies.

Today, a session that has been high on movement, even though it’s been low on data. And the Bank of Japan’s attempts to control bond yields has impacted bond prices across the globe.

Despite trade talks, shares continue to rise, but for how long? And what’s happening to Australian inflation – a temporary falter or the start of a softening trend?

The Bank of Japan’s changing approach to yield control and China’s policy to protect the economy had the most impact on markets today.

Overnight we saw US stocks fall and bond yields up, but the real action has been in China with a weakening of the Renminbi reportedly kept under control by lots of buying from state banks.

The Aussie and Kiwi dollar were two of the worst performing currencies overnight.

The new approach to China isn’t any softer.

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